AmaBhulu – The Birth and Death of the Second America was first published in November 2013 as an e-book, and is now also available in a 630 page B&W printed softcover edition. This work is a comprehensive study of the complete history of South Africa, but with the unique differentiation that it tracks a few real bloodlines through that entire history. AmaBhulu describes how real individuals of European and North American descent experienced that epic history on the ground. The reader is placed among these real people. The author is the first to point out that his family is in this respect “dreadfully typical” and completely representative. AmaBhulu is therefore not a family history, but a History of a Nation by way of a few example bloodlines who happened to have been at the key formative events in that history.

These bloodlines systematically converge and by the 1950s they lead to the author and his wife, proving the author’s natural DNA-based authority in writing on the subject. AmaBhulu thereby also differs from the library of books by British newspapermen talking either about or to Afrikaners who are then treated as “subjects”. In AmaBhulu the world may hear an ordinary Afrikaner—not a reporter beholden to his editor, politician beholden to his party, or government-paid political history professor beholden to his pay cheque—talking about his own people based on actual experience, backed by solid evidence. The author is beholden to no one and no thing; only to his conscience, to his ethics, and to his respect for evidence.

AmaBhulu provides more than 1280 notes in evidence and a massive 270 bibliographic entries in support of any points it makes. The evidence is often from 17th-19th century texts, communications, or diaries. In more recent cases, the evidence is provided from British Hansard records and recently cleared US State Department documents. The author even provides recent documented supporting evidence from the enemy he was opposing.

Join the author in the epic and painful story of the Afrikaner nation as it evolves at the southern tip of Africa to build the country that became to Africa what America was to the world in the 20th century. In one sense, it is the story of what would have happened to the United States if it had not gained independence in the 18th century.

In 1797 the British Royal Navy was concerned that South Africa would become a “Second America” and take India from them. AmaBhulu holds stern warning for the First America if it wishes to avoid the present sad fate of the Second America.

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